Sustain-Able 余 : ♥ www.CeciliaYu.com

….wild is the wind…creative freedom is the seed….

UPDATE 2017: UN Consultative Status at last! :) Africa since 2012: iProtest Arts and PEPA cultural collaboration to end Rape in Conflict zones!

521520_3023696603060_376488970_nunflagJan 2017 Update: 

Hello PEPA/ Family, 

Congratulations for the great work and determination, I am happy to inform you that PEPA/NGO (Pleaders of children and Elderly People at risk) was recommended for a special United Nations Consultative Status.
100 Nonprofit worldwide were accepted for the special status while 50 others were denied the Consultative status.
Congratulations to you all.
You can find the information on the links below:
We are proud of you all, and remember the journey has started, stay focused and determined.
Best regards
Appolinaire Zagabe
PEPA/NGO

Iprotest by dancing with pride, confidence and a sense of tradition…My body, my dance!

292267_10151578606120207_777095206_23625608_388910344_nsource: PEPA Our Mission is to promote, protect and defend the Human dignity of the human person and contribute to the Integral Development in any sector/area of life. We are launching this Dance project for the women who had been victims of Rape as a weapon of conflict all over the Congo. This is a PEPA-Sustain-Able (Yu) joint project. We want to restore cofidence & human dignity back to the Women of Africa! http://pepahumanitaire.org

From PEPA: Our Mission is to promote, protect and defend the Human dignity of the human person and contribute to the Integral Development in any sector/area of life.

We are working in partnership with some, Local, National and International Charity organizations in UGANDA and in DR.Congo,This is the case of:

  • Human Rights House/Uganda
  • MONUSCO: United Missions in DR.Congo
  • IDUKA Coorporation
  • (International Student Organization)
  • Parliament of Children/DRC
  • Unicef /DRC
  • Aid Medical –DRC

What is the “My Body, My Dance!” Program?

When PEPA and Sustain-Able (Yu) decided to work together on the board of IProtest Arts Charity, we discussed ways we can incorporate some of the discussions we had during the Inspiring Women Summit 2012 . Initially I thought we could just work with the Nobel Women’s iniative’s “End Rape in conflict” campaign. But as I looked at the details of how much PEPA already had in terms of sustainable cultural local community buy-ins, I decided to go back to what I KNOW works best and that is simply: Ask what is needed and then see what can be done about facilitating it.

This meant:

-no top-down external campaigns where no matter how PC one tried to be, it always turns into too much Anglo-white world telling Black Africa what to do. This is unfortunate but it is the social reality of the history between the Anglo world and Africa. WE must all live with the burden of our predescessors choices in history. Failing to do so, would dishonour our missions more.

– I did not see the method being all that different to the methodology of globalisation and corporatisation. Of course from a top-down UN and UNICEF perspective this made strategic sense. But after looking at the specific circumstances, I did not find it a good use of the 30 NGO clusters time to fill in endless bureacratic reports and feasibilities. Why not do it the chinese-african way? Get it done and stop theorising about whether it will work or not. Just try it out first and slowly the correct organic strategy will emerge because the wisdom, the education and the local knowledge are already in place.  So in that respect, we are in complete agreement with what the Nobel Laureate Jody Williams & Lynne Twist talked about, ” Sometimes people think it takes a lot to get anything done but most of the time you just have to be willing to go out there, start something and then figure it out along the way.”

But where I distinguish PEPA-Sustainable Yu collaboration is that we are highly educated Gen-X & Yers from Asia and Africa, we KNOW the value of traditions. We know that the last thing the situation needs in the long sustain-able term of the word is an imported solution. Technological assistance is always welcome, other kinds of technology based resources will be valued and appreciated. But when it comes to dealing with the human psyches and what HEALING is about. Yes, we are talking about “healing”; not just for the women in the congo who had been victims of rape as a weapons of war but for the entire human dignity and sanity of ALL those whose lives had been connected directly or indirectly to such atrocities, HEALING must come from a deep root in the Sustainability of the culture.

There was a turning point in our dialogue where PEPA and Sustain-Able (Yu) became in total agreement, that we are going to just get started with the idea of “dance for your sanity!”…lets just start with the message of: Your dignity is your own. Your body is your own. Your Dance is an expression of both individuality, collective confidence in LIFE and an affirmation of a better time.

Dance is universal and the music of africa had influenced SO MANY world music and western music, it became a natural “Tao” for us to see if there’s any innovation in bringing together the incredible and rare traditional dances of the Congo with Ska music! So we experimented with a first video just to test out the idea and it is very joyful and life-affirming. It is not a case of West telling Africa what to do or stereotyping about Black people because

Ska combined elements of Caribbean mento,  calypso with American jazzand rhythm and blues.

It is characterized by a walking bass line accented with rhythms on the upbeat. In the early 1960s, ska was the dominant music genre of Jamaica and was popular with British mods. Later it became popular with many skinheads.

***Which we found EXTRA FANTASTIC and IRONIC in 2012, that we take a music by black power, favored by white RACISTS back to Africa to empower the very people who had been victims of hatred and violence! RAPE is not a sex crime, RAPE is a WEAPON for Violence! The Women in the Congo know what their traditional cultures are and we are mixing in some new sounds just to see if they like it? Traditional and Innovation! That is the TRANSFORMATIVE UNIVERSAL POWER OF THE ARTS!

-We just want to emphasize that this is not some program to cosmetically address the issues of healing for those who were victims of rape in conflict. Our program will work with practical healings such as sustainable livihoods, medical help, advocating the needs of the children and the elderly in the community along with the need for women to be given the “circle of peace & safety” to heal. PEPA’s cluster of NGO have the mechanisms in place.

It is a time to stop going to endless conferences and “talk, talk, talk”. It is a time to just “do, dance, do”…a time …not to “give permission” but to encourage “taking of power” back….a time where human dignity is as vital as water, food, shelter and medical care…..a time to cry, a time to laugh again and a time to DANCE.

Because in the Dance that we are encouraging the women in the Congo to do, we are not the spectators nor the audiences…we are the “witnesses” to the absolute irrefutable fact that the ladies will be saying: “My body, MY DANCE! I choose to dance and I can choose to not dance…but whatever I choose, it will be for me and all the women like me.”

DETAILS of 100 Entities with UN Consultative Status: ECOSOC6809

Continuing Session, Non-governmental Organizations Committee Recommends Consultative Status for 100 Entities, Defers Action on 54

Continuing its regular session for 2017, the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations today recommended 100 organizations for special consultative status with the Economic and Social Council and deferred action on the status of 54 others.

The 19-member Committee considers applications for consultative status and requests for reclassification submitted by non-governmental organizations.  Once an application has been reviewed and approved by the Committee it is considered recommended for consultative status.  Organizations which were granted general and special status can attend meetings of the Council and issue statements, while those with general status can also speak during meetings and propose agenda items.  Organizations with roster status can only attend meetings.

Action on several applications were postponed because Committee members requested further information from the candidates about, among other items, details of their respective organizations’ activities, partners, expenditures, sources of funding and relationship with United Nations system actors.

The Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations will meet again at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, 1 February, to continue its session.

Special Consultative Status

The Committee recommended that the Economic and Social Council grant special consultative status to the following organizations:

Bangladesh Jatiyo Mahila Ainjibi Samity (Bangladesh);

Barrackpore Elderly Care Society (India);

Ben Newman Hope Care Foundation (Ghana);

Blood Donors Organisation for Social Service (BOSS) Pakala (India);

Build Africa (Cameroon);

Bureau d’Informations Formations Echanges et Recherches pour le Developpement “B.I.F.E.R.D.” (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Centre Africain D’echange Culturel (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Centre d’Observation et de Promotion de l’Etat de Droit (C.O.P.E.D) (Togo);

Centre d’action pour le développement rural (Togo);

Centre d’Education et de Développement pour les Enfants Mauriciens (Mauritius);

Centre for Gerontological Studies (India);

Centre for Women Studies and Intervention (Nigeria);

Chikka Federation of India (India);

Combite pour la paix et le développement (Haiti);

Community Active in Development Association (CADA) (United Republic of Tanzania);

Community Research and Development Organization (CRDO) (Pakistan);

Coordination nationale des associations des consommateurs (Mauritania);

Cultural Meeting Foundation (Iraq);

DESSI International (Pakistan);

Diligent Care for Creative Intelligence Development (Nigeria);

Distance Education For Africa (DE Africa) Enseignement à Distance pour l’Afrique (Kenya);

East Africa Consortium International (Somalia);

El Ghad Essihi Pour le Développement et la Protection de L’Environnement en Mauritanie (Mauritania);

Finance Center for South-South Cooperation Limited (China);

Fondation Espoir et Vie (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Fondation Vivons Ensemble (Congo);

Fundacao Museu do Futuro (Brazil);

Grameen Development & Poverty Alleviation Sangstha (GDPAS) (Bangladesh);

Habitat Alliance (India);

Healthy Caribbean Coalition Inc (Barbados);

Holly Heart United (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Human Development Society the Gambia (Gambia);

Humanitarian Ambassadors NGO (Iran);

Idara-i-Talim-o-Aaghai (Centre for Education and Consciousness) Public Trust (Pakistan)

Institute for Youth Development (Kyrgyzstan);

Kathak Academy (Bangladesh);

Maher (India);

Makhzoumi Foundation (Lebanon);

Manav Seva Sansthan (SEVA) (India);

Manusher Jonno Foundation (Bangladesh);

Mayan Families (Guatemala);

Newline Social Organization (Afghanistan);

Organisation Constellée pour le Développement Economique et Social de la Commune des Gonaïves (Haiti);

Orphélins, Déplacés et Incarcérés de Côte d’Ivoire (ORDIN-CI) (Côte d’Ivoire);

Peace & Livelihood Support Organisation (Nigeria);

Peace and Development Organization (Pakistan);

People of Good Heart (Nigeria);

Pleaders of Children and Elderly People at Risk “PEPAINGO” (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Public Association Women’s Organization “ALGA” (Kyrgyzstan);

RADION International Foundation (Thailand);

Regional Institute of Health, Medicine and Research (India);

Rural Planning and Developmental Organization (Bangladesh);

Rural Relief Foundation (Nigeria);

Rural Women’s Network Nepal (Nepal);

Rwanda Women Community Development Network (Rwanda);

Réseau Guinéen des Organisations des Personnes Handicapées pour la Promotion de la Convention Internationale sur les Droits des Personnes Handicapées “ROPACIDPH” (Guinea);

Réseau communautaire pour le Pauvre (Democratic Republic of the Congo);

Réseau des femmes africaines pour la gestion communautaires des forêts (Cameroon);

SERAC-Bangladesh (Bangladesh);

Social Economic and Governance Promotion Centre (SEGP) (United Republic of Tanzania);

Special Talent Exchange Programme (Pakistan);

Sukalyan Welfare Society (India);

Sulabh International Centre for Action Sociology (India);

Sustainable Development for Vulnerable Peoples in Bangladesh (Bangladesh);

The Association of the Egyptian Female Lawyers (Egypt);

The Center of Food Industries Association (Iran);

The Council of Technical Education and Training (India);

The Hashoo Foundation (Pakistan);

The National Society for Human Rights (Saudi Arabia);

Turnstone Global (India);

U.P. Planning and Development Research Foundation Incorporated (Philippines);

Ukrainian Charity Fund “Social Partnership” (Ukraine);

Union C (Nepal);

Utpidit Samaj Sarokar Kendra, Pokhara (Nepal);

Virutcham Magalir Munnetra Kazangiam, Virudhunagar (India);

World Peace Volunteers (Ghana);

Young Heart Foundation (Ghana);

“Enosh” – The Israeli Mental Health Association (Israel);

A.D.E.L. – Association for Development, Education and Labour (Slovakia);

Asociatia Tehnopol Galati (Romania);

Association A.M.OR (Switzerland);

Association MIMAN (France);

Associazione per i Diritti Umani e la Tolleranza (Italy);

Better World (Republic of Korea);

Biedrība “Donum Animus” (Latvia);

Blessing for Romania World Ministry (United States);

Burleson Institute Inc (United States);

CDP Worldwide (United Kingdom);

CIPINA (Centre d’Information et de Promotion de l’Image d’une Nouvelle Afrique) (Switzerland);

Canadian Centre on Disability Studies Inc. (Canada);

Center for the Global Study of Social Enterprise a NJ Nonprofit Corporation (United States);

Center for the Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry (United States);

Congressional Black Caucus Political Education & Leadership Institute (United States);

Consultation. Evaluation. Education., Inc. (United States);

Department of Political Science and Public Administration of the University of Athens Alumni Association (Greece);

Disability Rights Fund Inc (United States);

ERAN – Israel’s Association for Emotional First Aid via the Telephone, in memory of Dr. A. Zaslany (Israel);

Equal Rights for Persons with Disabilities International, Inc (United States).

The Committee postponed consideration of the following organizations:

Caribbean Natural Resources Institute (Trinidad and Tobago) — as the representative of Cuba asked which international organizations were providing funding.

Center for Assistance to Justice and Animation for Development (Cameroon) — as the representative of South Africa asked for disaggregated data on international groups that provided funding.

Community Empowerment and Development Initiative, Warri (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked how it fulfilled its mandate with the existing resources.

DHRUVH-Social Awareness Forum (India) — as the representative of India asked about details on dates and amounts that had been received by the Government of India in the last five years and specific details on the organization’s projects.

Drishti Foundation Trust (India) — as the representative of India requested that the Committee ask the group to provide the specific names of recent projects and their locations.

Dynamic Youth Development Organization (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details on the organization’s relationship with the Government of Nigeria.

Emmanuel Development Association (EDA) (Ethiopia) — as the representative of Burundi asked for details on which international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) were funding the organization.

Emperor Gaza International Foundation (Ghana) — as the representative of the Russian Federation asked for details on the year they had requested consultative status and the outcome.

Family Life Association of Swaziland (FLAS) (Swaziland) — as the representative of Cuba asked for details on financial expenditures.

Family Policy Institute (South Africa) — as the representative of South Africa asked for disaggregated data on expenditures and further information on projects to tackle human trafficking.

Formation Awareness and Community Empowerment Society (FACES) Pakistan (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan requested disaggregated data on funding.

Foundation for Disabled Women (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for more information on recent projects.

Heal The Planet Global Organisation-HTP (Uganda) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details on programmes the group had designed.

Health of Mother Earth Foundation (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details on how projects were implemented.

Imam Khomeini Relief Foundation (Iran) — as the representative of Sudan asked for clarification on funding from Government sources.

Initiative for Youth Awareness on Climate Change (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details on project implementation and funding.

International Centre for Leadership Development Nigeria (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details on Internet safety projects.

International Mayor Communication Centre Limited (China) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details on the group’s participation in General Assembly meetings of 2014 and other gatherings.

J.P. Foundation Inc. (Dominica) — as the representative of Cuba asked for disaggregated data on funding and the representative of South Africa requested further information on examples of current projects.

Legal Advice Centre (Kenya) — as the representative of Burundi asked how the group operated without any budget for administrative activities.

Millennium Network for Community Development Initiative (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked who the group was affiliated with while attending conferences.

Mkokoteni Aid Development Organization (Kenya) — as the representative of Burundi asked for details on project implementation and funding.

National Centre for Promotion of Employment for Disabled People (India) — as the representative of India asked whether the organization had registered with the Government of India.

Navjivan Foundation (India) — as the representative of India asked for disaggregated details on international funding or grants.

Niger Delta Budget Monitoring Group (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details on regional-level activities.

Organisation Mauritanienne pour la lutte contre l’extremisme et pour l’appui à l’unité Nationale (Mauritania) — as the representative of Mauritania asked for details on activities to counter slavery nationwide, including funding and the names of organizations it worked with.

Orion Projects Private Limited (India) — as the representative of India asked for the group’s correct contact address.

Orji Uzor Kalu Foundation (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for updated financial information and whether the group had an intention of registering with the African Union.

Pak Women (Pakistan) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for disaggregated financial data regarding international funding.

Pan African Climate Justice Alliance (Kenya) — as the representative of Burundi asked for financial details and the representative of South Africa asked for clarification on whether they had accreditation with other United Nations entities.

Reviving Hope Uganda (Uganda) — as the representative of Nicaragua asked for further details on activities.

Rwenzori Center for Research and Advocacy (RCPA) (Uganda) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details on “e-health” projects.

SWASTI (India) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details of projects in other countries.

Slum Child Foundation (Kenya) — as the representative of Burundi asked for more information about funding from other NGOs.

Somali Youth Development Foundation (SYDF) (Somalia) — as the representative of Cuba requested further details on project expenditure.

Standards Charter (India) — as the representative of India requested further project information and the income and expenditure for the last two years.

The Arab Council for Supporting Fair Trial (Egypt) — as the representative of Sudan asked for details on funding discrepancies between income and expenditures.  The representative of the Russian Federation asked about refugees without statehood and the position taken by the organization on the issue and about details on other Arab countries it was active in.  The representative of South Africa asked for examples of activities occurring after 2012.

The New Woman Foundation (Egypt) — as the representative of China said the income and expenditure contain a deficit, asking for details on that issue and funding in general.

The Red Elephant Foundation (India) — as the representative of Pakistan asked for details on projects in other countries and, similarly, the representative of India requested information on the list of countries where it was operating.  The representative of Cuba asked for details on how the organization could execute its projects with the current budget.

Women and Child Watch Initiatives (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details on the organization’s relationship with Governments and Government agencies.

Women’s Rights and Health Project (Nigeria) — as the representative of South Africa asked for details on capacity-building programmes.

shOObh Group Welfare Society (India) — as the representative of India asked how Government funds had been used by the organization.

Al-Hasaniya Moroccan Women’s Project (United Kingdom) — as the representative of South Africa asked for the names of partners the organization worked with in Morocco and whether it worked with the Government of Morocco on promoting change.

Alliance des Avocats pour les Droits de l’Homme (France) — as the representative of Cuba asked which Latin American countries the organization was operating in.

Alliance internationale pour la défense des droits et des libertés (France) — as the representative of Cuba asked for the exact number of countries the organization operated in and the names of local partners.

Alliance pour la Solidarité et le Partage en Afrique-Jeunesse pour Intégration Culturelle et Sociale (Switzerland) — as the representative of Cuba requested further information on the budget deficit, detailed project budgets and disaggregated data on private sector funding.

American Human Rights Council (United States) — as the representative of Cuba requested clarification on whether the organization operated outside national borders and details in that regard.

Canadian Council for Refugees (Canada) — as the representative of Venezuela requested clarification on funding deficit and other organizations the Council works with.

Comisión Unidos Vs Trata (Mexico) — as the representative of South Africa requested funding details.

Comité des observateurs des droits de l’homme (France) — as the representative of Cuba asked what other partners the organization worked with in order to fulfil its objections.

Dream Touch for All (Republic of Korea) — as the representative of Venezuela asked what steps the organization was taking to expand its operations and requested details of its projects of the last three years.

Drug Policy Australia Limited (Australia) — as the representative of South Africa requested budget clarification.

European Centre for Democracy and Human Rights Limited (Belgium) — as the representative of Sudan requested additional information as to whether members of its executive body were elected or nominated.

Interactive Discussion

During a question-and-answer session this afternoon, NGO representatives answered questions posed by the Committee.

A representative of the organization Global Fund for Widows described her group’s activities, which focus at eliminating poverty at its source.  Citing examples of efforts, including assistance programmes in the Caribbean, she said a total of 97 per cent of its total $100,000 budget goes to helping widows.

The representative of Cuba asked about countries that she hoped to work in in the future.  The organization’s website indicated members were Egyptian citizens, she said, asking about the nationality of those members.

The representative of the Global Fund for Widows said the organization had approved programmes in India and was considering one in Nepal.  The members were actually board members, as the organization did not have members that received benefits.

The representative of India asked about details on events the organization had attended and its activities in India.

The representative of the Global Fund for Widows said she had found a wonderful partner organization in India.  Nepal was also a leader in fighting discrimination against widowhood, as was South Africa.

The Committee then recommended the organization be granted special consultative status.

A representative of the organization Major Groups Partnership on Forests provided an overview of activities, which included organizing global workshops and facilitating multi-stakeholder dialogue.

The Committee then recommended the organization be granted special consultative status.

A representative of the organization Holt International Children’s Services Inc. said its key focus was adoption and foster care.  It also supported deaf children and family strengthening programmes in Ethiopia.

The representative of India asked about the organization’s work in India.

The representative of Holt International Children’s Services Inc. said that in India the organization focused on empowering children living in adversity and women-run households.

The representative of China asked the organization to refer to Taiwan with the correct terminology.  He also asked about its projects with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and to elaborate on adoption projects in China.

The representative of Holt International Children’s Services Inc. said his programmes in China focused on family strengthening activities, not only adoption cases.  On Taiwan, he said the organization had already addressed that it would use United Nations terminology to address Taiwan.  He would submit that in writing.

The Committee then postponed consideration of the organization pending further information.

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6 comments on “UPDATE 2017: UN Consultative Status at last! :) Africa since 2012: iProtest Arts and PEPA cultural collaboration to end Rape in Conflict zones!

  1. Bad hermes collier de chien
    January 11, 2015

    Jesus christ who authorized that.
    And what is this disgusting mysogyny with giving grown women dog’s collar by hermes? Despicable.
    hermes collier de chien http://rentalvacationproperty.com/AWStats/index4.asp?hermes=hermes-collier-de-chien-23nf.php

    • ceciliawyu
      January 12, 2015

      Well…let the market forces decide. Who are the type of women willing to put a dog’s collar on themselves and put up with mysogynist arseholes calling them “b*tches”?
      But somehow I don’t think Jesus Christ had anything to do with “Rape as a Weapon of war and conflict” in the Congo. You gotta look at the type of arseholes doing that to 51% of the world’s population and cull them…economically at the very least. 🙂

  2. Pingback: PEPA L’humanitaire, “my body, my dance” programme for victims of Rape in Conflict. | Iprotest Arts Charity

  3. Pingback: Iprotest by dancing with pride, confidence and a sense of tradition…My body, my dance! « Sustain-Able 余 : Cecilia's Blog

  4. Appolinaire ZAGABE
    May 28, 2012

    Thank you Cecilia for page, it’s really wonderful , On behalf of PEPA ,IPROTEST and my self I say thank you for supporting and implimenting this project in Congo,

    As many women of Congo are traumatized of worse situation of rape, I believe this initiative will consolidate them.
    This is more rebuilding a new mind in Congolese women to forget the hard moment crossed and still crossing of sexual violence.

    My request to all friends, readers, organizations,compagnies, Musicians to Support PEPA trough IPROTEST by promoting and encouraging Cultural dance in the DR.Congo.

    Stop rape in DR.Congo by giving and doing what you can to promote this program.
    Just Contact IPROTEST or PEPA for more Information.
    Thanks.

    • ceciliawyu
      June 5, 2012

      I look foward to seeing the results of this program, lets get started and deal with the Nobel Women Initiative Later! lets not fluff around waiting for the UN! hahahaha. zzz. (CC)

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